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Earthquakes

Activities

1.  Here is the activity from today's podcast!  Smartypants - you can simulate this at home with a deck of playing cards, index cards or paper plates. Take two cards or plates and pretend they’re the earth’s tectonic plates.  Holding the outside edges, push the inside edges together.  Eventually one is going to slip and go on top of the other!

2.  Buildings in earthquake zones need to have different rules to make sure they are safe.  Check out this building experiment to see what happens with different building styles.  If you have any different kinds of building toys, you can make more houses to see how they handle shaking. 

3.  Did you know you can learn about plate tectonics with graham crackers and whipped cream?  Yum!  Ask an adult before you start this one but this is a great way to see the different ways the Earth's surface moves.

According to the United States Geological Survey, an organization responsible for monitoring earthquakes, there are around 500,000 detectable earthquakes each year!  That's a lot of earthquakes!  So, why do earthquakes happen? Why are some worse than others? And what should you do if/when an earthquake strikes? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Earthquakes for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life Earth History

Mosquitos

Activities

1.  Make your own mosquito!  Ok, not for real, these will be much cuter, but you can make it so that it really buzzes!  

2.  Learn about the life cycle of a mosquito.  (Ask a parent's permission before going online.)

3. How fast can you flap your arms?  Is is 500 times a minute?  How about 20?  Set a timer and see how fast you are!

As you're probably painfully aware, mosquitoes are everywhere -- and they’ve been around since the dinosaurs. But why do mosquitoes seem to enjoy annoying us?  Why do they buzz and suck blood, and how come their bites itch so much?  And would the world really be better off… without them? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Mosquitos for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Animals Human Body

Glass

Activities

1.  Glass makers have been making stained glass windows for hundreds of years.  Create your own stained glass window using glue and paint!  Make sure you ask an adult first!

2.  Suncatchers are another way you can use glass to make art!  This one doesn't actually use glass but it looks like it!  

3.  Dale Chihuly is a famous artist who uses glass to make amazing works of art.  The art projects here require adult supervision because many use heat or scissors -- but, they are a great way to create your own art!

Did you know, the earliest man-made glass dates back to around 3500 BC? Obviously, glass is super versatile, and you make almost anything from it. But where does glass come from? How is it made? And how is it molded into so many things? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Glass for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Halloween

Activities

1.  Ask an adult if you can decorate a pumpkin!  Have an adult help you handle any sharp carving tools.  Or, you can always paint your pumpkins!  Be creative.  You can add stickers or glue on googly eyes or stick Mr. Potato Head pieces into your pumpkin! 

2. Do you know what you're going to be for Halloween?  Sketch or draw your most perfect Halloween costume if you could be anything in the world!  

3.  A big part of Halloween is about trick-or-treating - which means lots of candy!  List out all the candies you can think of.  How many have you had?  What are some you've never had?  You can even look online for strange candies around the world!  And remember, after eating your Halloween candy -- be sure to brush your teeth (or, at the very least, eat an apple!)

Have you ever wondered where the traditions of Halloween came from? Why do you trick or treat? Or, dress up in costumes? Or, carve pumpkins?  Take a trip back through time with us on this spooktacular episode of Who Smarted?!

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Halloween for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Tacos

Activities

1.  If you are feeling crafty, you can make a paper taco!  Make sure you add all of your favorite toppings!

2.  Go to the library and read Dragons Love Tacos, by Adam Rubin!

3.  Ask an adult if you can help make tacos for dinner!  An adult should probably handle the sharp or hot parts -- while the kids grate cheese and work on the assembly process!

Did you know, the taco you've come to know and love has only been around since the 1800's?  And tacos have only been in America for a little more than 100 years. But where did tacos originally come from?  How have they evolved over the years?  And how did they become one of America’s favorite comfort foods and one of the best loved foods on the planet?       

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Tacos for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Food History

Roller Coasters

Activities

1.  Do you have Hot Wheels track or a cookie sheet and some cars?  Try to make a ramp or loops, depending on your building materials!  Does the car go faster if the ramp is level or steep?  Would your invention make a fun roller coaster?

2.  You can also build a roller coaster using foam tubing and marbles!  Learn about the physics of a roller coaster by playing with your design.  

3.  Want to ignore the laws of physics?  Draw the craziest roller coaster you can imagine!  Don't like drop hills?  No problem!  Think it would be fun to flip 24 times?  You got it!

Believe it or not, roller coasters don't rely on an engine to give you the ride of your life in under 2 minutes!  So, how do roller coasters work? How did they evolve from early ones… on ice?  And what are the wildest ones today? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Roller Coasters for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Scabs

Activities

1.  Ready to see how blood thickens?  Make sure you ask an adult first, because this is a messy one, but here are two experiments that let you see how blood thickens to become a clot.

2.  Blood has several things inside of it that work together to help your body heal.  Ask an adult if you can make a blood model in a bottle!

3.  Scraps and cuts happen, especially to growing children.  Sit down and create a First Aid Kit with the adults in your house!  If you need some ideas, here is a list from the Red Cross.  Adults, make sure to keep medications and sharp objects away from children.

Chances are, if you’ve been physically active lately, the skin on your knee, elbow, finger or foot, might show evidence of a bump, bruise or scrape. And, if it's a big enough scrape... you might even have... a SCAB!  But what are scabs? How do they form?  What is their purpose? They might look like just a hard, reddish patch - but there’s actually a lot going on under there!   

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Scabs for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life Human Body

LEGO

Activities

1.  Ole invented a new kind of toy using a simple idea. Now it's your turn!  What kind of toy would you invent? Sketch it out on paper, or make a prototype (a model that shows your idea is possible) out of cardboard or other materials.  You can even use LEGO bricks!  

2.  LEGO bricks can be used for all sorts of learning activities.  Check out these ideas with the permission of an adult!

3.  Go build with LEGO!  You can build a track for cars, a house for your guinea pig, or a spaceship flowerpot.  Don't like what you made?  No problem! Take it apart and try again!  Some of the best learning happens when you make mistakes.

Lego sets have been around for 90 years!  Chances are, you’ve built something yourself or seen something built from LEGO bricks. But how much do you really know about Lego? Who invented Lego? What does the word LEGO even mean? And why should you only say LEGO and never LEGOS? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about LEGO for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Games and Toys

Jupiter

Activities

  1. Build a model of the solar system!  You can either build one in the house or build a big one outside!

2. Jupiter has a very strong magnetic field.  You can explore magnets here.

3.  Ask a parent if there's a nearby planetarium you can visit.  If there is, go see one of their shows and pay special attention to Jupiter!

About 400 years ago, Jupiter became well-known for having a 'Great Red Spot' in its Southern Hemisphere.  Look at any picture of Jupiter -- ya can’t miss it!  But what exactly is the 'Great Red Spot?'  What's it made of? Why hasn’t it gone away? And what strange things are happening to it... today? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Jupiter for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Space