fbpx

Earthquakes

Activities

1.  Here is the activity from today's podcast!  Smartypants - you can simulate this at home with a deck of playing cards, index cards or paper plates. Take two cards or plates and pretend they’re the earth’s tectonic plates.  Holding the outside edges, push the inside edges together.  Eventually one is going to slip and go on top of the other!

2.  Buildings in earthquake zones need to have different rules to make sure they are safe.  Check out this building experiment to see what happens with different building styles.  If you have any different kinds of building toys, you can make more houses to see how they handle shaking. 

3.  Did you know you can learn about plate tectonics with graham crackers and whipped cream?  Yum!  Ask an adult before you start this one but this is a great way to see the different ways the Earth's surface moves.

According to the United States Geological Survey, an organization responsible for monitoring earthquakes, there are around 500,000 detectable earthquakes each year!  That's a lot of earthquakes!  So, why do earthquakes happen? Why are some worse than others? And what should you do if/when an earthquake strikes? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Earthquakes for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life Earth History

Glass

Activities

1.  Glass makers have been making stained glass windows for hundreds of years.  Create your own stained glass window using glue and paint!  Make sure you ask an adult first!

2.  Suncatchers are another way you can use glass to make art!  This one doesn't actually use glass but it looks like it!  

3.  Dale Chihuly is a famous artist who uses glass to make amazing works of art.  The art projects here require adult supervision because many use heat or scissors -- but, they are a great way to create your own art!

Did you know, the earliest man-made glass dates back to around 3500 BC? Obviously, glass is super versatile, and you make almost anything from it. But where does glass come from? How is it made? And how is it molded into so many things? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Glass for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Halloween

Activities

1.  Ask an adult if you can decorate a pumpkin!  Have an adult help you handle any sharp carving tools.  Or, you can always paint your pumpkins!  Be creative.  You can add stickers or glue on googly eyes or stick Mr. Potato Head pieces into your pumpkin! 

2. Do you know what you're going to be for Halloween?  Sketch or draw your most perfect Halloween costume if you could be anything in the world!  

3.  A big part of Halloween is about trick-or-treating - which means lots of candy!  List out all the candies you can think of.  How many have you had?  What are some you've never had?  You can even look online for strange candies around the world!  And remember, after eating your Halloween candy -- be sure to brush your teeth (or, at the very least, eat an apple!)

Have you ever wondered where the traditions of Halloween came from? Why do you trick or treat? Or, dress up in costumes? Or, carve pumpkins?  Take a trip back through time with us on this spooktacular episode of Who Smarted?!

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Halloween for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Roller Coasters

Activities

1.  Do you have Hot Wheels track or a cookie sheet and some cars?  Try to make a ramp or loops, depending on your building materials!  Does the car go faster if the ramp is level or steep?  Would your invention make a fun roller coaster?

2.  You can also build a roller coaster using foam tubing and marbles!  Learn about the physics of a roller coaster by playing with your design.  

3.  Want to ignore the laws of physics?  Draw the craziest roller coaster you can imagine!  Don't like drop hills?  No problem!  Think it would be fun to flip 24 times?  You got it!

Believe it or not, roller coasters don't rely on an engine to give you the ride of your life in under 2 minutes!  So, how do roller coasters work? How did they evolve from early ones… on ice?  And what are the wildest ones today? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Roller Coasters for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life History

Scabs

Activities

1.  Ready to see how blood thickens?  Make sure you ask an adult first, because this is a messy one, but here are two experiments that let you see how blood thickens to become a clot.

2.  Blood has several things inside of it that work together to help your body heal.  Ask an adult if you can make a blood model in a bottle!

3.  Scraps and cuts happen, especially to growing children.  Sit down and create a First Aid Kit with the adults in your house!  If you need some ideas, here is a list from the Red Cross.  Adults, make sure to keep medications and sharp objects away from children.

Chances are, if you’ve been physically active lately, the skin on your knee, elbow, finger or foot, might show evidence of a bump, bruise or scrape. And, if it's a big enough scrape... you might even have... a SCAB!  But what are scabs? How do they form?  What is their purpose? They might look like just a hard, reddish patch - but there’s actually a lot going on under there!   

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Scabs for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life Human Body

The Calendar

Activities

1.  Younger children sometimes have a hard time understanding how time passes, especially when they are waiting for a fun activity like a birthday or family vacation.  PBS has fun instructions on how to make a custom calendar with your child.

2.  Some children understand time better when they can manipulate pieces.  This Paper Chain Countdown was designed for the start of school but you could use it for anything they are looking forward to -- even the next school break!

3.  Want to use a calendar to help your kids remember chores?  Start a 'chore chart'!  You could use a print out of a calendar or purchase one.  Write down their chores so they can check them off each day after completing them.  (TIP: Be sure to set up a rewards system for doing a good job!)

You've probably used one as recently as today or this week -- but why do we have seven-day weeks, and months that vary from 28 to 31 days? Where do the names of the months come from? And craziest of all, did you know the calendar you use today is full of... mistakes?!?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about The Calendar for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life History

Bedtime

Activities

1.  Sometimes, it's hard to go from being very busy to being calm enough to go to sleep.  If your brain and body still feel busy at bedtime, try story time!  Have an adult read to you or, read a story from a book yourself!  It can be something new or an old favorite.  Either way, reading is linked to feeling sleepy.

2.  Does your brain prefer music to calm down?  You could try listening to some calming music as you fall asleep.  What kind of music do you find best for falling asleep to?

3.  Did your busy day include lots of fun, messy play?  Take a bath or shower!  A warm, relaxing bath or steamy shower will not only get you clean, but help you relax and be ready for a good night's sleep!

Look, you might not feel tired - but guess what, all humans, animals, plants, and in some cases, even germs– need to balance activity versus rest. But why do you need a bedtime? How do you go to bed when you're not tired?  If no one told you when to go to bed would you just stay up forever? And what are the best ways to insure a peaceful, restful bedtime? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Bedtime for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life Human Body

Airplanes

Activities

1.  Time to make your own airplane!  Check out these directions for making paper airplanes and see who can fly their plane the farthest!  

2.  The Wright brothers learned how things fly by building kites.  You can build your own kite.  Here are some simple instructions -- but please ask an adult if you'd like to search for more complex designs.  

3.  Airplanes are not the only thing that fly.  Check out these instructions to make a paper helicopter. Don't forget to color it!

Did you know, worldwide, nearly 10 million people board over 100,000 flights… every single day! But have you ever wondered how the airplane was invented?  Or, how something so big & heavy can fly at all? And why do you crave peanuts or potato chips while you’re cruising at 30,000 feet? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Airplanes for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life History

Sweat

Activities

1.  Time to get outside and sweat!  Actually, we mean exercise, but if you're doing something that keeps your heart rate up, you'll likely be sweating a little.  Grab an adult and go fro a bike ride, jog, or play some basketball!  

2.  Running around isn't the only way to break a sweat!  Other physical activities, like doing pushups can also raise your heart rate and make you stronger.  

3.  When you sweat, you need to make sure you drink lots of fluids so you don't get dehydrated.  Check out this experiment using potatoes to see how your body loses fluids.

Did you know sweat is made of water, salt, and a dash of other chemicals?  But why do you sweat when you’re nervous? Or, when it's hot out? Where does sweat come from and how is it helping you despite making you look like you just went swimming?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Sweat for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life Human Body