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Earthquakes

Activities

1.  Here is the activity from today's podcast!  Smartypants - you can simulate this at home with a deck of playing cards, index cards or paper plates. Take two cards or plates and pretend they’re the earth’s tectonic plates.  Holding the outside edges, push the inside edges together.  Eventually one is going to slip and go on top of the other!

2.  Buildings in earthquake zones need to have different rules to make sure they are safe.  Check out this building experiment to see what happens with different building styles.  If you have any different kinds of building toys, you can make more houses to see how they handle shaking. 

3.  Did you know you can learn about plate tectonics with graham crackers and whipped cream?  Yum!  Ask an adult before you start this one but this is a great way to see the different ways the Earth's surface moves.

According to the United States Geological Survey, an organization responsible for monitoring earthquakes, there are around 500,000 detectable earthquakes each year!  That's a lot of earthquakes!  So, why do earthquakes happen? Why are some worse than others? And what should you do if/when an earthquake strikes? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Earthquakes for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Daily Life Earth History

Comets

Activities

1. You can make your own comet on a stick!  It's not a snack, but it is a fun way to see how a comet's tail follows it!

2.  What to know what is inside the center of a comet?  You can read more about how scientists found out here.

3.  Halley's comet is very cool looking.  What if you discovered your own comet?  What would it look like?  Try your hand at DRAWING your very own, personalized comet!

Did you know comets are COOL?!  As in, cool like a snowball. But also super cool to see!  Of course,1000 years ago, people thought comets were scary or an omen of bad things to come!  They're not.  But, what exactly are comets? Why did people fear them?  And, when can you expect to see another big, bright one? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Comets for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Earth Space

Clouds

Activities

1.  Want to make your own cloud? Check out these instructions for a shaving cream cloud!  You don't have to use blue food coloring if you would like to have a different color “rain."

2.  If you would like to see how a cloud forms, NASA has a great experiment using warm water and ice!

3. Different shapes of clouds have different names.  You can use paint to create your own.  How are they different?  How are they alike?

You probably know that clouds are part of the rain cycle and provide rain and snow... but what exactly are clouds? What are they made of? Can you sit on one? And what do clouds have to do with… pizza??? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Clouds for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth

Hurricanes

Activities

1.  Hurricanes are unique storms, in part, because of their wind patterns. Check out this wind map to see how the wind pushes storms across the United States.  What is the wind doing where you live?

2.  Barometers help scientists measure atmospheric pressure.  Before modern weather forecasting, barometers helped scientists understand the fundamentals of the weather. You can make your own barometer at home following these instructions.

3.  Want to track hurricanes yourself?  NOAA has a chart you can print out and track the next storm across the Atlantic.

Did you know that 40% of ALL hurricanes that strike the US, hit Florida!  But how do hurricanes form?  How powerful are they?  What do storm categories mean?  And what should you do when a hurricane strikes? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Hurricanes for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth

Antarctic Animals

Activities

1.  Antarctica probably isn't on your family's road trip list -- but thanks to this site you can take a virtual tour!  

2.  Many animals in Antarctica eat krill.  Check out this game on National Geographic Kids and help krill escape from predators.

3.  Can't get enough penguins?  Check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium Penguin Cam!  They  feature African Penguins, which are a little different than the ones in Antarctica, but they all belong to the same penguin family.

Did you know Antarctica is a desert. It's true! In fact, it's the largest in the world, covering 5.5million square miles! It's also home to 8 types of whales; 200 species of fish, 7 species of penguin, 60% of the world’s seal population and all kinds of invertebrates. But how do all these cool creatures withstand such cooold temperatures?  Why do they live there?  And how do they survive? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Antarctic Animals for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Animals Earth

Octopuses

Activities

1.  Octopuses rely on camouflage to hide from predators.  Can you camouflage yourself?  Maybe you pick clothes that are the same color as the couch -- or, you can use a blanket to hide and hold very still!  See if a sibling or adult can find you in your room while you're camouflaged.

2.  Make your own octopus!  Using bubble wrap for the legs will look like real tentacles!  Get the instructions here.

3.  A squid is not the same as an octopus but they move through the water the same way!  Check out this experiment to see how an octopus gets around.  If the weather is nice, you might want to try this one outside, it could get a little messy.

Have you ever heard the story about Inky the Octopus -- who climbed the glass of his tank at the International Aquarium of New Zealand, crawled across the floor and slithered down a drain hole and escaped!?!  Octopuses are super smart, but what else are they capable of?  What’s a day in the life like for one of these clever, squishy, sticky, mollusks?  And how do they catch food while also avoiding being food?   

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Octopuses for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Animals Earth

Tornadoes

Activities

1. Tornadoes form from powerful thunderstorms -- but how does a thunderstorm form?  Check out this great visual of how air currents move and mix to create a storm.

2. Let's make it rain…water!  This easy experiment will demonstrate how warm air rises, is condensed by colder air, making it rain. Storms work the same way!

3. Does your community have weekly tornado siren tests during the spring & summer?  The next time the sirens are tested, make a family 'tornado plan' about where you should go if there's a tornado.  If your community doesn't have siren tests, it's still important to know where to go when the weather gets bad.

Did you know there are 40,000 thunderstorms happening around the world, every single day? But what causes a tornado to form? What’s the best way to protect yourself? And why do some tornadoes make it rain... frogs?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Tornadoes for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth

Asteroids

Activities

1.  People have observed meteors and astroids for a long time.  The internet lets those watching the skies share their findings so people can learn from each other.  The American Meteor Society has videos, photos and other information for a budding astronomer.

2.  Want to make your own asteroid?  Here are some directions!

3.  Did you know that NASA has landed a space probe on an asteroid before?  Read about this cool feat of engineering here.

Asteroids hit Earth all the time -- but what exactly are asteroids and where do they come from? What causes them to break free of their orbit and "attack" the Earth? And could what happened to the dinosaurs, happen again? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Asteroids for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth Space

Worms

Activities 

  1. Grab an adult and find a space where you can dig! It's time to go worm hunting! Gardens, flower beds, compost piles, and under downspouts are great places to look without digging up grass. Be gentle, but you can handle them and see how they move and feel. Make sure to put them back in the dirt when you are done! 
  2. Take a magnifying glass with you on your worm hunt. Does the worm look different under magnification? Can you see how it crawls or tell which end is the front and which is the back? 
  3. Ask an adult if you can make worms and dirt for dessert! It sounds gross but it's really chocolate pudding, cookie crumbs, and gummy worms! The gummy worms go in the chocolate pudding and you sprinkle the cookie crumbs on top. Yum! 

There could be over a million earthworms under the ground in a space the size of a Little League baseball field! But are earthworms good for the Earth? How do they get around with no arms or legs? And can a worm bite you?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Worms for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Animals Earth