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Tacos

Activities

1.  If you are feeling crafty, you can make a paper taco!  Make sure you add all of your favorite toppings!

2.  Go to the library and read Dragons Love Tacos, by Adam Rubin!

3.  Ask an adult if you can help make tacos for dinner!  An adult should probably handle the sharp or hot parts -- while the kids grate cheese and work on the assembly process!

Did you know, the taco you've come to know and love has only been around since the 1800's?  And tacos have only been in America for a little more than 100 years. But where did tacos originally come from?  How have they evolved over the years?  And how did they become one of America’s favorite comfort foods and one of the best loved foods on the planet?       

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Tacos for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Food History

Mac and Cheese

Activities

1.  Ask an adult if you can eat macaroni and cheese!  Make it from scratch or from a box, or both! Whatever your family likes best!  If you do make both - compare the two and rate which one is better!

2.  Not really into eating macaroni?  That's ok!  You can make crafts with it too.  Check out this macaroni fish project!

Oh yeah, it's no secret -- most kids (and lots of adults) LOVE mac and cheese!  You can eat it plain, add toppings, or bake it!  One of our founding fathers even helped introduce it to the United States!  But where did Mac & Cheese originate from? Who actually invented it? Or has it always just existed in some form or another? And did it really help America win World War II? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Mac and Cheese for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Food History

Food Discoveries

Activities

1.  The next time you go to the grocery store, have your child choose a fruit, vegetable or other food they've never tried before/don’t know. Then, once back home, play a 'Tasting Game!' You can make a tasting sheet to take notes. Have them write down the name of the food(s), then taste it.  They could even taste it without looking at it.  Have them describe it using all their senses.  Did they like it?  Was it squishy?  Slimy? Sweet?  Bitter?  Did it taste different cooked vs raw?

2.  Have fun describing food using only your eyes. Can you describe the color, shape and texture? Is it red like a raspberry or green like a pepper? Is it round or triangular? Is it grainy, smooth or soft? Does it look appetizing? This activity will help kids recognize their food preferences and name them.

3.  Time to eat!  You need:

  • 2 Bananas, peeled
  • 1/4 Cup peanut butter, divided (you could also use almond or sunflower butter)
  • 2 Tortillas

Spread your nut butter on the tortillas, place a banana in the middle and roll it up.  You can eat it like that or cut it into pieces like sushi!

Throughout human history, people have determined what to eat and, what not to eat, through a process called trial and error.  That led to learned behavior, knowledge passed down by our ancestors - as well as natural-born instincts. But, what about the earliest humans- how did they figure out what was safe to eat? Or not...

And who is working with food today to figure out not only what’s safe - but also, delicious? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Food Discoveries for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life Food

Lunch

Activities

1.  Help prepare and eat lunch!  What is your favorite lunch food?  PB&J?  Mac & Cheese? Leftovers?  Eating a proper lunch gives you the energy you need for all of your afternoon adventures.

2.  Need some healthy lunch ideas?  Here are 50 kid friendly lunch ideas.

3.  Design the perfect lunch box!  What pictures would be on the outside?  How big would it be?  Would it have any cool features like a built in ice cream machine or smoothie maker?

Did you know the word Lunch comes from the word "luncheon," -- which dates back to the 1650s and once meant "thick hunk" -- as in, a thick hunk of meat? Yeah, neither did we. But have you ever stopped to wonder WHY you eat lunch at all? Did someone actually invent lunch? And what is the most popular lunch food of them all? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Lunch for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life Food History

Flavors

Activities

1.  Check out this make your own rock candy experiment!  What flavor will you give your rock candy?  Make sure you have an adult help you with the hot parts!

2.  Set up a candy tasting experiment for your kids.  If you need some help, here are some ideas.  

3.  Time to try a new flavor!  Ask an adult if you can go with them to the store and pick out a new fruit or vegetable to try.  If your store has them, check out the dragon fruit!

We all know different foods have distinct flavors. But what about foods that can be many different flavors?  Like... jellybeans?  What gives foods their flavors?  How do scientists create different flavors, including gross ones (like dirty socks)?  And how can you make one food... taste like another? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Flavors for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Food Human Body

Cheese

Activities

1.  Do you call the classic sandwich below toasted cheese or grilled cheese?  Maybe you have a different name for it!  Whatever you call it, it's delicious and you can make one with an adult!  Grab your favorite bread, cheese, and even toppings to make your own personal version.

2.  Did you know you can make cheese at home?  Check out these step-by-step directions with an adult and enjoy your tasty science experiment for a snack!

3.  Ask an adult if you can go to the store and buy a new kind of cheese you've never tried before!  How does it smell?  How does it taste?  How do you think it was made and would you try it again?

Did you know France has 1,200 different varieties of cheese?  But what exactly is cheese?  How come some are stinky? Or moldy?  And is American Cheese... actually cheese? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Cheese for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Food History

Sugar

Activities

1.  BrainPop has some great resources for kids.  Help your child understand that larger portions have more calories or sugar. When they read food labels, they should look at the serving size. What is the serving size for cookies? Juice? Measure out the proper serving size for cereal, juice, or other foods or beverages. You and your child might be surprised at what a typical serving size really is!

2.  Have your child track everything they eat for an entire day -- from beverages and snacks to meals and dessert. You can join in the activity, too. If possible, have them pay attention to the serving size as well. If your child uses two servings of salad dressing, they should record that as well. Then tally up the number of the day’s calories together. This might be a good opportunity to use a calculator or practice adding large numbers and regrouping. What is the recommended daily calorie intake for your child? You can look it up online and then compare.

3.  The FDA has a great PDF on how to read nutrition labels and make healthier food choices.  Check them out!  Find your favorite food and read the nutrition label.  It is a healthy food or something you should enjoy in moderation?

Did you know you can find sugar in lots of different foods -- not just the obvious things like lollipops or other sweet treats?  Yep, it’s also in bread, ketchup, canned sauces, and chips. Of course, despite being in so many things - sugar is... not great for you.  Which begs the question: Why WOULD something bad for you, taste so good?  And when we say sugar’s bad for you - what exactly do we mean?  What does it do to your teeth?  Or your insides?  Or, your brain?  Why do we use so much sugar in so many things -- and how much sugar is too much sugar? 

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Sugar for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Food History

Gum

Activities

1.  The largest bubble gum bubble ever blown was 50.8 centimeters (20 inches).  How large can you blow a bubble?  Make sure you check with an adult, just in case the gum gets messy.  

2.  Gum flavors have changed a lot since gum became widely available in the 1940's and 50's.  Ask an older adult what flavor was their favorite when they were a kid and how much they paid for it.  You might be surprised!

3.  Ask an adult before you start this sticky experiment from the Museum of Science + Industry in Chicago.  You'll stick gum to an old shoe and try to find the best way to get it off!

If you're like most people, you probably enjoy chewing gum -- but have you ever wondered how gum was invented?  Or, what gum is made of?  Or, if it’s good for you?  Oh, and what REALLY happens if you swallow it? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Gum for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Daily Life Food

Donuts

Activities

1.  Time to play with your food!  Ok, not really, but here is a fun donut game you can play with a piece of cardboard and some pencils.  Make sure you have an adult help you cut out the hole in the donut.

2.  Check out the book, "If You Give A Dog A Donut!"  Read it with your favorite adult, a younger sibling, or your dog!

3.  Ask an adult if you can have a donut!  Maybe your family has a donut shop nearby or maybe you get them from the grocery store.  Either way, they are a fun breakfast or dessert item!

Did you know early doughnut-like treats in ancient Greece and Rome were covered in... fish sauce? Yuck!  A lot has changed from those early doughnuts -- including the spelling of doughnut to... donut!  But how was the modern donuts invented?  Why do donuts have holes?  And why are they even called 'dough' ‘nuts'?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Donuts for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Food History