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Jupiter

Activities

  1. Build a model of the solar system!  You can either build one in the house or build a big one outside!

2. Jupiter has a very strong magnetic field.  You can explore magnets here.

3.  Ask a parent if there's a nearby planetarium you can visit.  If there is, go see one of their shows and pay special attention to Jupiter!

About 400 years ago, Jupiter became well-known for having a 'Great Red Spot' in its Southern Hemisphere.  Look at any picture of Jupiter -- ya can’t miss it!  But what exactly is the 'Great Red Spot?'  What's it made of? Why hasn’t it gone away? And what strange things are happening to it... today? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Jupiter for free here!

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Space

Comets

Activities

1. You can make your own comet on a stick!  It's not a snack, but it is a fun way to see how a comet's tail follows it!

2.  What to know what is inside the center of a comet?  You can read more about how scientists found out here.

3.  Halley's comet is very cool looking.  What if you discovered your own comet?  What would it look like?  Try your hand at DRAWING your very own, personalized comet!

Did you know comets are COOL?!  As in, cool like a snowball. But also super cool to see!  Of course,1000 years ago, people thought comets were scary or an omen of bad things to come!  They're not.  But, what exactly are comets? Why did people fear them?  And, when can you expect to see another big, bright one? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Comets for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here

Earth Space

Dwarf Planets

Activities

1.  National Geographic Kids has some fun pictures and facts about the 5 named dwarf planets.  Which one would you like to explore?

2.  NASA invents devices to prepare astronauts for space as well as equipment that can explore on its own.  Make your own hover car and see how far you can make it go!  Could it help you explore a dwarf planet someday?

3.  In order to explore a dwarf planet, NASA needs to get close to it.  The only way to do that is to fly their equipment as close to it as possible.  Wing design makes a big difference with fuel efficiency and control  Check out this challenge and see if you can improve it!

The most famous dwarf planet of all is of course, Pluto. Pluto, named for the Roman God of the Underworld because of its cold/dark nature, used to be know as a planet -- but then got demoted to dwarf planet status known as a planet. But what exactly is a dwarf planet?  What makes dwarf planets different than planet planets?  How many dwarf planets are there?  And why was Pluto, kicked out of the planet club? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Dwarf Planets for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Space

Asteroids

Activities

1.  People have observed meteors and astroids for a long time.  The internet lets those watching the skies share their findings so people can learn from each other.  The American Meteor Society has videos, photos and other information for a budding astronomer.

2.  Want to make your own asteroid?  Here are some directions!

3.  Did you know that NASA has landed a space probe on an asteroid before?  Read about this cool feat of engineering here.

Asteroids hit Earth all the time -- but what exactly are asteroids and where do they come from? What causes them to break free of their orbit and "attack" the Earth? And could what happened to the dinosaurs, happen again? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Asteroids for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth Space

Habitable Zone

Activities

1.  People need water to make a planet habitable.  On Earth, we have the water cycle, which provides rain for crops to grow and water for people to drink.  Check out this fun experiment!  Make sure an adult helps you with the hot water.

2.  Being able to grow food is another important part of a habitable planet.  You can read about a seed's lifecycle here.  Ask an adult if you can plant a few seeds in a pot and watch them grow!

3.  Would you like to live in a place where it snows every day?  How about all sunshine, all the time?  Think about what kind of weather you like outside and draw a picture.  What temperature does it need to be before it can snow?  What temperature is best to go swimming?

Habitable Zones refer to regions in space in which planets have 'Earth-like' conditions, that can potentially support life as we know it.  But what makes a planet potentially habitable?  How many other habitable planets have we discovered?  And could there possibly be life elsewhere in the universe? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Habitable Zone for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Earth Space

Blackholes

Activities

1.  How do black holes work?  Check out this easy science experiment to see how some things are pulled into a black hole.

2.  Here is a fun video explaining how a black hole works!

3.  Gravity keeps things in orbit by pulling on them.  Check out this fun experiment to see how it works!

Did you know the gravitational pull of black holes is so strong, not even light can escape it?  But what is a black hole, how are they formed and what would happen if you got too close to one?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Blackholes for free here!

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And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Space

Galaxies

Activities

1.  Want to learn more about galaxies?  PBS has some great videos and other resources for you to learn about galaxies and what makes each one unique.

2.  Galaxies are always moving.  You can create your own swirling galaxy in a jar by following these instructions.  Make sure you get permission from an adult first!

3.  You can make constellations, or groups of starts, shine on your walls!  Print your own constellation cards and grab a flashlight.  Next time you are outside after sunset, try to find your favorites in the night sky!

As you probably know, we all live in the Milky Way galaxy.  But did you know there are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of other GALAXIES in the universe?  What do they look like, how were they formed and how long would it take to travel to one? 

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Galaxies for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Space

Mars vs Venus

Activities

1.  Find out what you would weigh on Mars!  This website does all of the math for you.  All you need is your current weight in pounds.

2.  Mars takes longer to make one round trip around the Sun then the Earth, which means you would have had fewer birthdays on Mars!  While your grandparents might like that, that would mean fewer birthday parties for you!  Check out this age calculator to see how old you would be on Mars.  

3.  Venus has thousands of volcanos.  You can make a safe volcano at home.  NASA has a wonderful experiment that lets you make your own volcano, complete with lava channels.  If you want to know more about Venus, you can read more on the NASA website!

You probably know that Mars and Venus are our closet neighbors in the solar system.  But, which would be the better planet to live on?  Why do we always talk about exploring Mars but not Venus? What is it like on the surface of Mars and Venus?

Listen to the short Who Smarted? episode for kids about Mars vs Venus for free here!

Want to receive great science and history activities like these three times a week for free? Sign up here!

And for amazing screen-free edutainment for elementary school kids, homeschool families, and anyone curious,  nothing beats our podcast Who Smarted - three times a week, for free! Listen or subscribe from your favorite podcast app here!

Space